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Lenovo Expands Linux-Ready Computer Line

23.09.2020 16:19

As the next step in its Linux expansion program, Lenovo has launched Linux-ready ThinkPad and ThinkStation PCs pre-installed with Canonical's Ubuntu technology. The company also now brings Linux certification to its ThinkPad and ThinkStation Workstation portfolio, along with easing deployment for developers and data scientists, as it moves to certify the full workstation portfolio for top Linux distributions from both Ubuntu and Red Hat.

From: www.technewsworld.com

How Cloudera Enables Enterprises to Address Radical Change

23.09.2020 15:06

eWEEK BIG DATA ANALYSIS: Last week, the company announced new and upcoming data services based on the Cloudera Data Platform (CDP). Coming a year after the company purchased Arcadia Data, a provider of cloud-native, AI-driven business intelligence and analytics solutions, makes that acquisition seem particularly prescient.

Tags: PC
From: www.eweek.com

Colin Moriarty's Twin Breaker: A Sacred Symbols Adventure Releases on Xbox One, Switch and PC

23.09.2020 14:36

Edgar writes - "Previously a PS4 and PS Vita exclusive, Twin Breaker: A Sacred Symbols Adventure is now available on Xbox One, Switch and PC."

Tags: SWIFT, Xbox One, PS4, PC
From: n4g.com

Wednesday evening news briefing: Rishi Sunak poised to unveil furlough successor

23.09.2020 12:17


If you want to receive twice-daily briefings like this by email, sign up to the Front Page newsletter here. For two-minute audio updates, try The Briefing - on podcasts, smart speakers and WhatsApp. Sunak poised to unveil successor to furlough scheme Rishi Sunak has a problem. His furlough scheme, which successfully protected millions of jobs through the first lockdown, closes at the end of October. It has been winding down since August, encouraging people to go back to work and limiting the bill to the Treasury, which currently stands at £40bn. But a resurgence in the virus means new restrictions have been introduced, with experts warning the economy could "easily" slide back into reverse this autumn. The Treasury is working on plans for a successor to the furlough scheme to fend off a wave of unemployment in the autumn, with the Chancellor set to give a statement to the Commons tomorrow on his plans to protect jobs. This reportedly includes the possibility of the state subsidising the wages of workers able to work 50-60pc of their normal hours. Yet if this does not seem feasible, financially or politically, what other options does Mr Sunak have? Tim Wallace sets out what the Chancellor could take from other nations. Tonight will see Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer make his own address to the nation on the BBC, which you can get an update on here. It comes after Boris Johnson set out the latest national restrictions on TV last night. But confusion still hangs over the nation after Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab issued a stark warning to the public that if the coronavirus rules are not obeyed, Britain could face a second lockdown by Christmas. It comes as the UK has recorded 6,178 new cases of Covid-19 in the last 24 hours - the third highest daily total since the pandemic began. Here is what a second lockdown could mean for house prices. Perhaps Sir Keir will hope his address isn't seen by Matt Lucas after his Great British Bake Off spoof of Mr Johnson's briefings. Lorry drivers need post-Brexit permit through Kent Lorry drivers will need permits to access Kent or face police action in a bid to avoid post-Brexit gridlock, the Government has said. Cabinet Office minister Michael Gove said work is ongoing to avoid the possibility of 7,000-truck-long queues in the county caused by a lack of preparation for the end of the Brexit transition period this December. Conservative former minister Damian Green said such a prospect would "send a chill" through his Ashford constituents. Mr Gove confirmed the so-called 'Kent Access Permit' is being readied, but did not confirm exactly when it would be up and running. Our politics liveblog has details of his appearance in the Commons. It emerged JPMorgan is moving about €200bn (£184bn) of assets from the UK to Germany as the end of Brexit transition period approaches. For worried bosses, read five ways businesses can prepare for the end of the Brexit transition period. Prince Harry risks diplomatic row over US voting drive The Duke of Sussex has urged people in the US to "reject hate speech" as he risks a diplomatic row by joining a voting drive for the country's upcoming presidential election. The Duke, who as the grandson of the Queen has until now felt an obligation to remain politically neutral, appeared alongside his wife in a video on the US voting registration day. The Duchess, who is an American citizen and has undertaken several recent events ahead of the election, said: "Every four years, we're told, 'This is the most important election of our lifetime.' But this one is." It comes as bookmakers put Meghan at 100/1 to be the next US president. Read what Prince Harry said sitting beside her in the video broadcast. At a glance: Latest coronavirus headlines Travel latest | 'Do not book overseas holidays', pleads Sturgeon Bringing in the Army | Military will not be needed, says police chief Sir Paul Smith interview | 'I've never faced challenge so devastating' Dragging on | Majority thought pandemic would be over by now Corner shops | Small retailer trial to offer free cash withdrawals Also in the news: Today's other headlines Racial prejudice | Uncle Ben's rice products will be renamed Ben's Original after its owner Mars acknowledged that the logo depicting an elderly African-American man promoted racial stereotypes. The revamped Ben's products, which feature the same blue font, orange packaging and half of the name, will hit shelves in 2021. The change comes as Colston Hall has been renamed Bristol Beacon following protests over its association to the slave trade. Read on for details. Coffee spiked | Train station cleaner put detergent in boss's drink British diplomat | Cause of death remains 'unascertained' Alexei Navalny | Putin critic discharged from German hospital End of the phone charger? | Tiny 'wind turbines' may be used instead Tasty discovery | Monkeys find new species of truffle Around the world: 470 whales stranded, feared dead Rescuers trying to free a pod of whales beached off the Australian island of Tasmania said today they had found another 200 stranded mammals, bringing the total to 470 and making it one of the country's biggest beachings. As a rescue effort began its third day off the southern island's rugged west coast, rescuers said they spotted another large group of pilot whales during an aerial reconnaissance of remote Macquarie Harbour, and most were believed to be dead. Watch shocking footage. Wednesday interview 'They started shooting each other - and I started running'

The pixel-art ARPG Oceans Heart is coming to PC via Steam in early 2021

23.09.2020 10:25

Video game publisher Nordcurrent and Max Mraz, the developer behind Zeldalike tribute to "Bloodborne"," Yarntown", today announced they are bringing their newest IP, "Oceans Heart", a beautiful pixel-art adventure RPG with modern twists and turns, to Steam for PC in early 2021.

Tags: PC
From: n4g.com

The third-person sci-fi puzzle/platformer Seed of Life is coming to PC in 2021

23.09.2020 10:25

Leonardo Interactive, a new publishing label dedicated to delivering original adventures with outstanding visuals and engaging gameplay and owner of VLG publishing, and developer Madlight Studio have announced that their futuristic, third-person, sci-fi puzzle platformer, "Seed of Life", will arrive on PC via Steam next year.

Tags: PC, MEP
From: n4g.com

Succubus interview with Madmind Studio - Succubus, Agony, Paranoid, and thoughts on censorship

23.09.2020 10:25

"just recently I sat down with Tomasz Dutkiewicz (the CEO and founder of Madmind Studio) from Madmind Studio and we ended up talking about everything from the upcoming release of "Succubus", the success story behind "Agony", Madmind Studio's brand-new game project ("PARANOID") to Tomasz thoughts on censorship at large." - Robin Ek, TGG.

Tags: PC
From: n4g.com

The Russian Trolls Have a Simpler Job Today. Quote Trump.

23.09.2020 8:06


WASHINGTON -- Four years ago, when Russian intelligence agencies engaged in a systematic attempt to influence the American presidential election, the disinformation they fed U.S. voters required some real imagination at the troll farms producing the ads.There was the exaggerated Texas secession movement, a famous ad in which Satan arm-wrestles Jesus while declaring, "If I win, Clinton wins," and an effort to recruit protesters and counterprotesters to the same, invented rally over the rapid spread of Islamic influence in the United States.This year, their task is much easier. They are largely amplifying misleading statements from President Donald Trump, mostly about the dangers of mail-in ballots.In interviews, a range of officials and private analysts said that Trump was feeding many of the disinformation campaigns they were struggling to halt. And rather than travel the back roads of America searching for divisive issues -- as three Russians from the Internet Research Agency did in 2016 -- they are staying home, grabbing screenshots of Trump's Twitter posts, or quoting his misleading statements and then amplifying those messages.That campaign is at the heart of the disinformation efforts that the FBI director, Christopher A. Wray, warned Congress last week was meant "to both sow divisiveness and discord" and "to denigrate" former Vice President Joe Biden, the Democratic nominee. Trump chastised him for his comments on Twitter."But Chris, you don't see any activity from China, even though it is a FAR greater threat than Russia, Russia, Russia," he said. He went on to repeat the kind of statements the Russians have been exploiting, writing that the two countries would take advantage of "our totally vulnerable Unsolicited (Counterfeit?) Ballot Scam."Twitter flagged the president's tweet, urging readers to click on a link to "learn how voting by mail is safe and secure."The FBI and the Department of Homeland Security on Tuesday again warned of the risk of interference in the election, this time by foreigners aiming to exploit the time it will take to sort through mail-in ballots. During that time, the agencies said, hackers could amplify "disinformation that includes reports of voter suppression, cyberattacks targeting election infrastructure, voter or ballot fraud and other problems intended to convince the public of the elections' illegitimacy."The warning made no mention that the president had recently listed several of those techniques as likely to plague the vote.Multiple U.S. officials with access to the intelligence have said Trump has been doing the job of the Russian propagandists for them. Biden's national security adviser when he was vice president, Antony J. Blinken, charged at a U.S. Chamber of Commerce forum Tuesday that as a "leading consumer and purveyor of conspiracy theories," Trump "seems to have suited up for the other side."Clint Watts, a former FBI special agent and a fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute, said his review of the disinformation traffic showed that "the Russians in 2016 had to make false news stories or manipulated truths to power their narratives.""This time they're not writing anything that's not already said in U.S. space," often by Trump himself, Watts added. "They must be flabbergasted and saying, 'We really don't need to work hard this time.' "Much of the Russian traffic echoes Trump's effort to establish an argument for rejecting the election results if he loses in states that are mailing ballots to all voters for the first time. But of the states doing so for the first time this election, only Nevada is seriously in contention.No sooner did Trump begin to contend that the system was ridden with fraud than Russian trolls, bots and news sites joined in. In late May, the state-backed Russian website RT was quick to publish an article claiming that such ballots "are the easiest route to a RIGGED ELECTION."By early August, the Strategic Culture Foundation -- an online journal that the State Department declared recently "is directed by Russian Foreign Intelligence Service" -- had picked up on the same theme, according to analysts at Recorded Future, a group based in Somerville, Massachusetts, that analyzes cyberactivity by foreign governments.An article appearing on the Strategic Culture website concludes: "President Trump has several times claimed that the expected surge in mail-in voting could result in 'the most corrupt vote in our nation's history.' Trump is often wrong when he speaks or tweets spontaneously, but this time he just might be right."And this month, the Russian government news site, Sputnik, published an article headlined, "Trump Again Claims Biden May Be Using Drugs to Enhance His Debate Performances," repeating comments the president made on Fox News. That piece was republished by the right-wing website Infowars, disseminating it more widely in the United States, and readers shared it on social media. That allowed the article to spread without running the risk that it would be removed because it was an "inauthentic" post by a Russian troll in St. Petersburg pretending to be American.The Russia proxy website Newsfront went further, reporting "confirmation of rumors about Biden's incapacity." It is the exact type of disinformation a homeland security intelligence bulletin warned Russian actors have amplified "because they judge this narrative will resonate with some American voters and reduce their confidence in him as a candidate."Feeding the Russian desire to discredit the election system was also what the Republican-led Senate Intelligence Committee warned against in its report on how Moscow tried to manipulate the 2016 election."Sitting officials and candidates should use the absolute greatest amount of restraint and caution if they are considering calling the validity of an upcoming election into question," the committee concluded, without dissent from its Republican majority. "Such a grave allegation can have significant national security and electoral consequences, including limiting the response options of the appropriate authorities, and exacerbating the already damaging messaging efforts of foreign intelligence services."Now, his own bureaucracy finds itself stuck between their intelligence findings and an angry president. The day before Trump scolded his FBI director on Twitter, General Paul M. Nakasone, the director of the National Security Agency and commander of United States Cyber Command, warned of the dangers of Russian disinformation -- which his agency has pledged to counter.Nakasone has vowed to take steps to knock such disinformation offline, as he did in the 2018 midterm elections, when Cyber Command attacked the Internet Research Agency, the digital propaganda shop that operates from St. Petersburg, disabling its systems for a number of days. One veteran of Cyber Command noted that the general's mission in the next six weeks may involve taking down Russian posts that are quoting his boss.Intelligence officials, for their part, are battling an effort by Trump and his top advisers to cast China and Iran as equal threats to the election, which runs counter to their intelligence.A homeland security official, Brian Murphy, said in a whistleblower complaint that the leadership of the Department of Homeland Security, including the agency's acting secretary Chad Wolf, blocked the release of a threat assessment that contained warnings of Russian interference because of how it "would reflect upon President Trump."The senior officials instead directed analysts to highlight threats posed by China and Iran, which have generally targeted Trump, according to Murphy. While both are threats, officials say, their operations are neither as extensive nor as sophisticated as the Russians. They are longer-term concerns, though Trump's national security adviser, Robert C. O'Brien, has sought to portray them on equal footing with Moscow.Former officials say they are concerned that such contradictory assessments play into Russia's hands. "If the adversary's goal is to undermine confidence in the legitimacy of the process, then it's incredibly important we have voices to counter that objective," said Suzanne Spaulding, a former under secretary for cybersecurity and critical infrastructure at the Department of Homeland Security. "And if the credibility of those voices has been undermined, then it makes the adversary's jobs that much easier."In a draft of the assessment from August, homeland security analysts wrote: "Russia probably will be the primary covert influence actor and purveyor of disinformation and misinformation within the homeland."They continued, "We assess that Moscow's primary objective is to increase its global standing and influence by weakening America -- domestically and abroad -- through efforts to sow discord, distract, shape public sentiment and undermine trust in Western democratic institutions and processes."Murphy said he learned in September that Wolf had ordered new drafts to be redesigned by his policy office. Wolf's department has now said it will be released Oct. 1. The Department of Homeland Security has rejected Murphy's allegations.Wolf has seldom highlighted the Russian threat in public remarks without also mentioning China and Iran.Harry Fones, a spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security, said the agency had tracked a growing threat from Russia, China and Iran."As a department it is our duty to defend our nation and critical infrastructure like elections from all threats, not just the one the news is focusing on," he said.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company

Hawaii Health Department Chemist Cooked Up LSD for Air Force Members: Prosecutors

23.09.2020 6:28


A government chemist in Hawaii cooked up batches of LSD for active-duty members of the U.S. military who responded to ads for the powerful hallucinogen posted on social media, prosecutors allege.Trevor Keegan, an “extract tech” in the Disease Outbreak Control Division of the state Health Department, was charged earlier this month on one count of conspiracy to distribute controlled substances. His alleged co-conspirator, Austin White, is not known to be affiliated with any government agency. He is facing the same charges as Keegan.The case came to the attention of investigators last September, when a confidential informant tipped off the U.S. Air Force Office of Special Investigations (OSI) about “an individual [who] was utilizing...Snapchat to advertise and conduct drug sales, particularly with active duty military service members.” The existence of the investigation has not been previously reported.Air Force Vet Who Shot Woman for Stealing His Nazi Flag Claims He’s Actually the Victim OSI turned the investigation over to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), which was soon able to identify the Snapchat dealer as White, prosecutors said.“White’s public Snapchat account showed the public advertisement of various controlled substances for sale with listed prices,” says a criminal complaint filed in Hawaii federal court. “One of the advertised controlled substances was Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (“LSD”), more commonly known as ‘acid,’ which is a schedule I controlled substance.”LSD use within the armed forces has become an issue of late. In 2018, rampant LSD consumption by members of the Air Force’s nuclear missile corps was exposed by the Associated Press. Since then, the Naval Criminal Investigative Service has reportedly launched nearly 200 investigations into LSD-related offenses, with cases spiking by 70 percent in the first four months of 2020. As recently as 2006, LSD use in the Air Force was so rare it was removed entirely from the standard drug tests given to airmen.In December 2019, an undercover DEA agent contacted White on Snapchat to arrange a purchase. During that meeting, White allegedly sold the agent 20 grams of “a suspected LSD mixture in the form of ingestible gummies” for $200. The following month, White sold the same undercover agent about $1,400 worth of gummies and tabs of blotter acid, the complaint states. White’s source “work[ed] in chemistry,” he told the undercover agent, and said he “makes his own stuff.” White then agreed to have “the cook” make another 300 blotter tabs in advance of their next meeting, according to prosecutors.That’s when White got sloppy. After getting $2,500 from his customer, White pointed to a car parked nearby. White allegedly told the undercover that the vehicle’s driver—and lone passenger—was his supplier, before walking over to retrieve the drugs. DEA agents were able to identify the driver as Keegan, according to court filings.Both men were arrested at the beginning of May. The blotter acid tested positive for LSD, although the gummies did not.“You would think that employees at the state disease outbreak control center would be too busy these days for such extracurricular activities,” Dan Grazier, an ex-Marine Corps officer who now works for the nonprofit Project on Government Oversight, told The Daily Beast. “I don’t recall a single instance of anyone testing positive for LSD when I was in the Marine Corps. I have heard it is becoming more common because it is quickly passed through the system and can't be detected in a urinalysis after 2 to 3 days.”Former U.S. Air Force squadron commander Cedric Leighton, who retired from the service as a colonel, said he discovered at least three of his airmen using LSD during his 26-year career.“Our service members are good people, but, like anyone else, they can be one bad decision away from ruining their careers and their lives,” Leighton told The Daily Beast. “I saw it as my job to help them avoid those bad decisions.”Keegan and White’s attorneys did not respond to a request for comment, nor did the U.S. Air Force Office of Special Investigations.Both men are free on $50,000 bail. Keegan is expected to plead guilty at the end of October.Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2 Update 1.25 Is Out, Here Are The Patch Notes

23.09.2020 6:25

Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2 has been updated to version 1.25 on PS4, Xbox One, PC, and Nintendo Switch. Here are the patch notes for this update.

Tags: SWIFT, Xbox One, PS4, PC
From: n4g.com

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